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Monday, June 27, 2011

My Wash and Color for Portrait

Hi, Friends, did you enjoy a weekend?This week, I'll chat over how to move on to a loose style from a stiff style, particularly, focusing on "my" wash and colour for portraits.
Below, I sketched the speaker at an exhibtion opening ceremony, while I was standing. The quicker, the better---for me.
I originally, came from quite a traditional watercolour style(See below). But a stiff style bored me and I tried a loose style. So, I totally understand others struggling to seek fresh and liquid expressions.In order to loosen up work, "value study" and "very accurate drawing skills" are the key. Mono tone painting is a good practice to check values. Below, the gig player was in a strong red light at a pub. Very good study of value. We enjoyed music and my work. I always prefer life models. Don't be shy. Just keep sketching at anywhere and anytime. I sketched the lady enjoying holidays at a pub. We enjoyed a chat together. Cerulean blue was added at a studio. Changing an angle is important, which builds 3D image. OK, lets' move on to my current painting process and colours. It could be different from yours. If you could pick up anything useful, I'm very happy.
Materials
1) Paper : Arche, 300, smooth
2) Pencil : Soft. 5B or bigger number
3) Brush : #12, (hardly use others)
4) Paints : Winsor Newton or Holbein. Very limited palette.
Raw sienna, Burnt sienna, Composed Green, Winsor Newton Yellow, Cadmium Orange, Permanent Rose, Antwerp Blue.
SettingUpright paper. Get on work at once. Make work in rush.
Painting Process
1) Start with middle value or dark area.
2) Leave highlight blank
...if I get any image for background, put colour at this stage
or make background later.
3) Enhance the darkest area = Make contrast more
4) Check balance in value & colour
Control of water is the pivot point for my style.
There's no magic, but practice.
In addition, sadly quick watercolour work is underestimated and put a low price at demonstration. Please consider, the work is a fruit of incessant practices for "years."
Be original and unique in a style.Happy Painting!



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66 comments:

  1. Thank you Sadami! This post was a perfect lesson for me as I have been trying to loosen up my figure painting as you know. The key I get from your post is twofold: limit water and draw from life, teo things I need to do more. Your paintings are some of the most expressive and wonderful I have come to know.

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  2. Wonderful post, Sadami. Enjoy the new week.
    Anonymous aka Carol B.

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  3. Magníficos retratos Sadami. Me encanta ese estilo suelto de tus obras.
    Gracias por la lección magistral.
    Un abrazo.

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  4. This is a wonderful explanation Sadami. Useful tips that I will try to do as well. thank you...ann

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  5. These are wonderful portraits, Sadami! And a great lesson! For me that is: practice, practice, practice....

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  6. These pictures are great, I like the brushwork and colors. Regards.

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  7. Thanks for the very useful tips Sadami. I must say that even if you got bored painting in the traditional watercolor style, the portrait you are showing is magnificent .
    And of course your actual loose style is what we are all aiming at...so many paintings thrown out in the attempt to obtain just that...!
    Have a nice week.

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  8. Thanks for your tips! I love your loose fun style of painting!
    vicki

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  9. What a treasure this post is. I did some quick sketching/painting yesterday and had to convince myself it was okay. Now that I read this I think I am on the right track.
    Thank you for all the sharing you do for us.

    Hugs

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  10. Dear Dora,
    Very happy to know you enjoyed this post. "Amount of water" is very tricky. It depends on what sort of techniques you choose. Wash is a good example. Find YOUR amount of water & work on your style.
    Cheers, Sadami

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  11. Dear Anonymous,
    Thank you for a kind encouragement. You, too, have a wonderful week.
    Kind regards, Sadami

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  12. Estimado Oñera,
    Gracias por estímulos. Mi camino es una opción. Explora acuarela y encontrar su orzuelo.
    Cheers,ʚ(ˆ◡ˆ)ɞ Sadami

    Dear Oñera,
    Thank you for encouragements. My way is one option. Explore watercolour and find your stye.
    Cheers,ʚ(ˆ◡ˆ)ɞ Sadami

    >>>Oñera said...
    Sadami magnificent portraits. I love the loose style of your works. Thanks for the lecture.
    A hug.

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  13. Hi, Ann,
    Thank you and I live your new avatar. Very happy to know you enjoyed this post. A loose style is very tricky. It depends on what sort of techniques you choose. Wash is a good example. Find YOUR style & work on your style.
    Cheers, Sadami

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  14. Hi, Judy,
    Thank you. Oh, everyone knows you make wonderful watercolours! You have to teach us, blog viewers. Let us, practice, practice!
    Cheers, Sadami

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  15. Dear Toñi,
    Thank you very much. I admire your watercolour paintings. You have to teach me how to do it!
    Kind regards,ʚ(ˆ◡ˆ)ɞ Sadami

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  16. Dear Jane,
    Thanks, but you say too muchʚ(ˆ◡ˆ)ɞ of me. Very happy to know your like my traditional style. Me, too. It was the turning point in my career. A picture book illustrator lecturer asked me, "Why did you put portraits in your profile CD?" I decided two directions to do : portrait & picture book.
    You have your own wonderful style. Make us happy!!
    Cheers, Sadami

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  17. Dear Vicki,
    Thanks!! Yes, let's have fun in ceating something. You're a genious of hand-craft!
    Cheers, Sadami

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  18. Yahoo, Irina,
    Thank you so much!!
    Cheers, Sadami

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  19. Hi, Teri,
    Thanks millions! Your work is always heartwarming and lovely. Find YOUR own style and work on your style.
    Cheers, Sadami

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  20. Hi, Evelyn,
    Thank you so much!!
    Cheers, Sadami

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  21. I agree Sadami...I like the spontaneous look! I sometimes cringe when I see my older work..it looks so controlled. Your watercolors are so "alive"
    .....I can sense heartbeats in each one!

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  22. Oh, thanks, Celeste!
    Today, your work, too, looks spontaneous, free & full of life. It seems we wanted to set OURselves from free from OURselves.
    Cheers&Hugs,Sadami

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  23. Very interesting feed-back Sadami. Thanks so much to share your experience.

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  24. Enlightening post, Sadami.
    Your traditional work is excellent - but your style now just sings with life :)

    And there in the midst of your writing - a real gem of a quote - "there is no magic, but practice."

    You are an inspiration, indeed .
    Have a great week, my friend :) xx

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  25. Dear Lydie,
    Thank you! You make beautiful work from any subjects. I've got to ask you to teach me landscapes and still life.
    Cheers, Sadami

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  26. Hi, dear friend Pat,
    Yes, that traditional portrait is actually a professor. That work has got the best feedback from among lecturers and students. I decided to go two directions : portraitist and picture book illustrator.
    Thank you. You're always kind and encouraging.
    Cheers, Sadami

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  27. Thank you for your tutorial, Sadami! I am always trying to became more loose in my portraits, but it seems to be too hard for me... but I will try and try, with your wonderful examples! Ciao!

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  28. oh dear Sadam, thank you. I am on the way to this loose style. your advice are very precious for me Thank you for all the sharing you do for us.

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  29. Dear Cristina,
    Thank you! Keep up and work on YOUR style. You've got to teach me landscapes that show an artist's inner world.
    Cheers, Sadami

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  30. Hi, Isabelle,
    Thank you. Already you know it and indeed, you make wonderful work. You've got to teach me how to do it.
    Cheers, Sadami

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  31. watercolor is always better fresh and loose i think!

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  32. Thanks so much for sharing your loose style and your materials. I like the new style - it has life in it that the previous one did not (although it, too, was a good portrait).

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  33. Your tutorial was most informative Sadami. Thank you. Loose is my favorite style as well. My drawing technique is loose. My painting techniques are still developing. I am still a stranger to painting, definitely in watercolor, somewhat with acrylics. From what I've read though, you are absolutely right when you say controlling the water is key in watercolor. It's written in every book on my shelf. Good post.

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  34. Wonderful advice! --so I guess oogling at your paintings won't get me anywhere if i don't practice :)

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  35. Dear Tiffanny,
    Thanks for encouragements! I love your watercolours. Unique, lively and very charming.
    Cheers, Sadami

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  36. Hi, Rhonda,
    Thank you! The old portrait(*professor) motivated me to loose up. I used only limited colours for that work, which gave me a hint of a limited pallete(*at the moment, I had no idea of watercolour techniques and never expected to be a professional). Hahaha, very good memoir and still uni friends say, "Hey, this such&such on a wall!" at my house.
    Cheers, Sadami

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  37. Dear Linda,
    Thank U! Sounds you're a very good researcher. Controlling water is the most tricky and very individual. I know a very famous Australian picture book illustrator, realist, "Robert Ingpen" who always uses dry brush strokes. Worth checking his images.
    Cheers, Sadami

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  38. Hi, Meere,
    Yes, so true without practice we cannot reach anywhere. Experiments brings experiences that lead to your own style.
    Cheers, Sadami

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  39. Dear Sadami, do you think Robert Ingpen is just avoiding the water challenge by using only drybrush? Could be? Right now at my stage of development, I like drybrush a lot.

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  40. Hi, Linda,
    Good Q! But as far as I look at his illustrations, Robert uses wahses as well. In other words, he is a multi-player and so sophisticated technician. (*I collected his work and studied it.)
    For me, "dry brush" is not easy at all. I still cannot get or find an appropriate amount of water for a brush. If you like drybrush, keep on. One day, you might become a great watercolourist like Robert.
    Kind regards,ʚ(ˆ◡ˆ)ɞSadami

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  41. I LOVE the look of your loose paintings, you are a gifted artist. Thanks for the tips too. I'm glad I found your blog. :)

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  42. Wow, Crystal,
    Thank you so much and welcome!! Let's have fun and share joy together!
    Cheers, Sadami

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  43. Hi Sadami, thanks a lot for your explanation, very useful indeed! Your portrait are for me a fantastic example of what I would like to achieve. Ciao!!

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  44. Hi, Tito,
    Thanks millions. You're so kind and nice for any emerging artist like me. Please keep up wonderful work and lead us.
    Kind regards, Sadami

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  45. Sadami,
    this post is exquisite and valuable!
    Share your experience is very gentle on your part! I felt like, to do a watercolor.. :))

    I really liked the tips on when to place the tones and it is good to know, someone experienced, like you, about 'letting go' in the works ... is good, right?
    I'm still very demanding with me; but that does not fit in watercolor; the beauty is to see the spontaneity inherent in the watery paint!

    and these results here are wonderful!
    beautiful works! congrats!
    I think your 'new friends portrayed'
    are very happy!

    thank you for this post!
    huge hugs to you!
    cheers!!

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  46. Hi, Denise,
    Thank you very much! You're always caring and encouraging. I love your work and comments.
    Spontaneous brush strokes are, in fact, a fruit from accurate drawings. Sounds contradicted, but true.
    Yes, models are all happy and smile more, when they look at my sketches.
    One day, you have to teach me how to use a computer. Your work is so fascinating, but it shows your lovely personality, too.
    Take care.Biiiig hugs,Sadami

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  47. Beautiful portraits, has a soul and seems to breathe. Cool.

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  48. Dear Leovi,
    Thank you for the wonderful compliments! I'd really appreciate them all.
    Cheers, Sadami

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  49. Beautiful portraits..loose and perfectly painted. I wish I can paint as loose as you..thank you for your wonderful tips, Sadami. You have helped us all as always.

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  50. Hi, Hilda,
    Thank you! You always make so beautiful pastel work. I admire your style. Keep up and work on your style. It's your lovely identityʚ(ˆ◡ˆ)ɞ.
    Cheers, Sadami

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  51. Awesome portraits. I really love the variations in style of these.

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  52. Tu lo has dicho Sadami: al final conseguimos el trabajo después de muchos años de práctica. Aquí no valen los atajos para ser un buen profesional. Trabajo, trabajo y trabajo.

    Un saludo desde Bilbao

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  53. Hi,Tim,
    Thank you so much! I know you, too, make awesome work. Let's have fun together!
    Cheers, Sadami

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  54. Dear Montse,
    Yes, it's true. You already know that truth and have been working on art. I admire your challenging spirit. Let us enjoy art!
    Cheers, Sadami

    Querida Montse,
    Sí, es verdad. Usted ya sabe que la verdad y han estado trabajando en el arte. Admiro su espíritu de desafío. Vamos a disfrutar del arte!
    Cheers, Sadami

    >>>Montse said...
    You said it Sadami: eventually got the job after many years of practice. Here are worth no shortcuts to being a good professional. Work, work, work.
    Greetings from Bilbao

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  55. these portraits are gorgeous Sadami ! I like your
    work so much !
    wish you a fantastic weekend
    bisous

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  56. Hi, Marty,
    Thank you very much! You, too, have a wonderful weekend!!
    Cheers, Sadami

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  57. Hi Sadami,
    Thank you for such a great instructional post. I agree there is a lot of practice in painting anything of value! And the portraits are definitely one of the hardest subjects to paint.
    Thank you for sharing the information Sadami,
    Irina

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  58. Thanks for sharing your process Sadami, it's always so great to see how others paint. Even though your old style was exquisite your current one let your personality shine through, keep on Sadami! <3

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  59. Hi, Irina,
    Thank you! Your watercolours always teach me. Especially, still life and flowers are absolutely beautiful. Very happy to follow your bog. Keep up.
    Cheers, Sadami

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  60. Dear Teresa,
    Oh, thank you. You are always nice and share your precious process and techniques. I'd really appreciate your generosity and openness.
    Kind regards, Sadami

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  61. Dear Yulendys,
    Thanks!!! Yul, you do the same thing, "great job"!
    Cheers, Sadami

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  62. Sadami.... Your sketchbook is such a treasure to look at. Your work always amazes me you have such a talent, and your genorosity in sharing and helping others is outstanding..Thank you.....

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  63. Hi, Stephie,
    Thank you! I believe "sharing" is another word of "happiness." We cannot be happy and all aloneʚ(ˆ◡ˆ)ɞ.
    Cheers,Sadami

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