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Friday, January 27, 2017

Where Do You Come From?

An old uni friend, her sister and I enjoyed the movie "Lion," nice dinner and wonderful "gelato"! (in a very popular Italiano shop!) The theme of the movie is identity, home and belongingness, based on a true story. A story is of a lost Indian boy, Saroo adopted to Australian parents. 25 yrs later, he desperately seeks for his biological family in India. Grown up Saroo's agony and obsessive seek for the place where he once had belonged to moves audience. A young boy played little Saroo very well. Landscapes in India are beautiful. I could hear many audience sob in a theatre. Me, too, tears up.
Identity is a very private, personal and delicate issue.
...,that's why I do not ask others, "Where do you come from?" I came across several people adopted in Australia in university and some meetings. Some people ask others to introduce themselves and question, "Where do you come from?" Of course, that question has no malicious intention to hurt others. But it could be too heavy to answer for adopted people. All adopted people I met were still searching for their biological parents. Like Saroo, they were frantically tracing back and could not find answers. It is heart breaking. When I heard their self introducing, I felt that question was too much. 
Yet, identity has a public element as well as private facts. So, we search for who we are individually in any form and socio-cultural aspects. Sometimes, we publicly get together, as if we ensure our identity and the belongingness of a group or a community. A clan is a good example. On Australia Day, Sydney Sketch Club enjoyed Celtic festival that had clan bands marching and dancing. Bagpipers and drummers were particularly gorgeous and glorious. My sketches are a bagpiper, a drummer and a lady drummer with pom poms. It is lovely to see the "performance of identity" in different forms. Each person looked so happy. 
However, if a person cannot either claim or clarify her/his identity openly and publicly, it is tragedy and a great pain. I'd like to think of such voiceless people or who have lost their identities in time. What do you think about identity and that question "Where do you come from?", Friends? A bit more sensitivity and kind concerns for others is necessary, if we ask a third party's origin such a personal topic. In my experience, once, others open their hearts, they tell their whole life background. Until that day, I do not ask others and silently await it with my genuine empathy.
Friends, Happy Painting!










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12 comments:

  1. These paintings are great, Sadami. As always the people and movement are perfectly depicted. I enjoyed examining how you painted the patterns of the tartan, lovely!
    I suppose the problem of belonging is different for different people. Being an introvert, I tend to be less dependent on others, their customs, opinions and acceptance. I grew up in one place and culture, which I didn't entirely accept, so I moved to another, more appropriate for my personality. Yet, I don't define myself through either environment. I try to live in harmony with my nature. When I think of it, this must be the only advantage introverts have, in this world where extroverts win on almost any account :)

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    1. Dear sweet Blaga, I love your comment. First of all, thank u, you like the paintings. I love capturing movements and face expressions. Tartan shows a same clan. Colours and patterns were lovely. Now, you and I are chatting over human beings in social and private aspects. I perfectly agree your say and understand it well, because me, too, chose the same way in life. Apart from being introvert or extrovert, being self-independent is important and precious. In psychology, I've learned that being an agency is one of the most important assets = taking responsibilities of behaviours. Uni study has given me deep thoughts of society, life and myself. I love us, people, humans more than ever. May my love come up in my paintings! You, too, enjoy painting!!! Finally, I really like your personality and who you are, Blaga, btw!
      Best wishes, ((Hugs)), Sadami

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  2. I'm getting old, so forgive if I've already told you this.
    My granddaughter is English and she's married to an Australian who's father was an Aborigine. Her mother (my daughter) has an American partner, my youngest son is married to a Japanese. My niece (who adopted us as her parents!!) is married to a French Algerian..... my wife is English whilst I am Welsh but having an Italian grandmother........ our JOINT nationality is FAMILY!

    My granddaughter did the DNA 'family ancestry thing' that shows we came to live in Wales after moving from Africa to Germany to Scandinavia over 1000s of years.

    The moral of the story - if there is one - is we're all part of the same rainbow.

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    1. Oh, John, I love your comments so much!!! Thank you very much for sharing your precious family story and wonderful feedback. Yes, me, too, have read an interesting article that when we trace back our DNAs, we eventually are all the same human beings, I believe so. It was interesting, a sociology lecturer asked different skin colour students to stand on a stage. Then, she asked us, "How many races can you tell?" Different numbers came up from us. BUT the lecturer told us, "Only one, same human beings!" and showed the evidence of a DNA research article. Yes, the lecturer wanted to tell us, like John's say, "We're all part of the same rainbow," that is so touching and lovely. I'll remember it and tell it to others!! Thank you!
      Please pass my hello and best wishes to your family.
      Kind regards, love and smile, Sadami

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    2. My granddaughter actually too a DNA test (mouth swab) and paid for the DNA analysis: which is what I mentioned above (Africa, Germany, Scandinavia etc)

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    3. Thank you very much, John, for sharing the story. Also, it needs to be added that "nationality" is unclear and ambiguous in historical and socio-economic aspects. An anthropology lecturer who was against racism told us, "Nation does not exist. It's an illusion made up by politicians." I agree and always countries are changing on a map. Your say, "We're all part of the same rainbow," is so lovely.
      Best wishes, Sadami

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  3. Preciosos dibujos Sadami, casi puedo oír la música y ver el movimiento de tus figuras. Eres genial.

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    1. Gracias, Tina. Sí, yo también. Mientras escribía este post, su música resonaba en mis oídos. xxx Sadami

      Thank you, Tina. Yes, me, too. While I was writing this post, their music was echoing in my ears. xxx Sadami

      >>>> Tina said...
      Beautiful Sadami drawings, I can almost hear the music and see the movement of your figures. You're great.

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  4. Wonderful portraits, as usual! Interesting questions lately: How young are you and Where do you come from. To broaden our feelings of belonging is important to peace and equality = we are all from this Earth and then we narrow that down in order to fit into a group and feel belonging like the Scots clans. Have a wonderful weekend!

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    1. Oh, sweet Rhonda, thank you very much! I hope we will accept anyone. Mutual help is the beauty of being human beings. You, too, have a wonderful weekend! Take care, friend! Best wishes, Sadami

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  5. fantastic figures Sadami ... love how you suggested the tartan !

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    1. Thank you, Jane. Please take care and enjoy your life!! Best wishes, Sadami

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